REPEAL PRWORA PROJECT – SAFEGUARD EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY

REPEAL PRWORA PROJECT – SAFEGUARD EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY

THE REPEAL MOVEMENT – PROVIDE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY

WHERE IS PROTECTION FOR SOCIAL SECURITY RETIREMENT INCOME INSURANCE PLAN?

EXTEND ERISA PROTECTION TO SOCIAL SECURITY OLD AGE INSURANCE PLANS

EQUAL TREATMENT OF ALL US TAXPAYERS FOR ALL EMPLOYMENT RELATED BENEFITS

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT AND RETIREMENT OPPORTUNITIES TO ALL US TAXPAYERS

ERISA PROTECTION MUST COVER INSURANCE BENEFIT PLANS OF SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

THE REPEAL – THE GREAT AWAKENING TO REVOKE SLAVERY IN MODERN ECONOMIC TIMES


On August 22, 1996, US President Bill Clinton (Democrat) signed into Law that reintroduced Slavery, Involuntary Servitude, Serfdom and Forced Labor in the pretext of making ‘A New Beginning’. Welfare Reform Act or Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) is unjust and unfair for it violates Constitutional Law that defends natural rights of all people living in United States. All US taxpayers must be treated as equals for receiving retirement income benefits for which they paid taxes.

GIVING VOICE TO HIDDEN PROBLEM – DEFEND ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE OF SENIOR ALIEN TAXPAYERS

NATURAL LAW vs MAN MADE LAW – SLAVERY IS CONTEMPT OF NATURAL LAW

US CONGRESS SLAVE DRIVER

US CONGRESS SLAVE DRIVER – THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 13th AMENDMENT. PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA SPOKE IN EMANCIPATION HALL ON CAPITOL HILL ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 09, 2015.

At a ceremony held in Emancipation Hall of the United States Capitol Visitor Center on Wednesday, December 09, 2015, President Barack Obama and leaders of Congress commemorated the 150th Anniversary of the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution. House Speaker Paul Ryan in his remarks stated that the Constitution is Supreme Law of the Land. The 13th Amendment is just 43 words long. I want to examine if those 43 words govern, rule, and operate the lives of all inhabitants of this Land.

US CONGRESS SLAVE DRIVER – THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 13th AMENDMENT. THE AMENDED SOCIAL SECURITY ACT FUNDAMENTALLY VIOLATES PRINCIPLES SHARED BY 43 WORDS OF THE 13th AMENDMENT.

My readers should not be surprised if I describe US Congress as “Slave Driver.” The reason for my claim is based on PRWORA enacted by US Congress in 1996 that amended US Social Security Act of 1935. This legal provision enacted by Congress is incorporated as Section 202(y) of the Social Security Act. It mandates that no Retirement Income benefits shall be payable to registered alien(non-citizen) taxpayers in the United States without showing proof of lawful residency as determined by the Attorney General. In my view, unexpired Employment Authorization Document (EAD) must not be demanded if worker has attained full retirement age as determined by law.

Social Security Act, Section 202(y) violates the principle enshrined in those 43 words called the 13th Amendment. This 1996 amendment to the Social Security Act is fundamentally flawed for it is unconstitutional. It takes away property rights (earnings, wages and retirement income) of individuals who paid Federal, State, Local, Social Security and Medicare Taxes working in this country to attain full retirement age.

US CONGRESS SLAVE DRIVER – THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 13th AMENDMENT. THIS STATUE OF FREEDOM BEARS MUTE TESTIMONY TO ACTS OF CONGRESS.

The Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln (Republican) in September 1862 came into effect on January 01, 1863 freeing slaves in all territory still at War with the Union. These slaves were not citizens of the Land and had no political rights of their own. In Law, Servitude or Slavery refers to the burden imposed upon property of a person by a specified right another has in its use. Servitude involves labor in which the person who performs labor has no right to his earnings from labor.

The amended Social Security Act unconstitutionally gives power to Social Security Administration to withhold property (wages, earnings, monthly retirement income benefits) of alien workers who are not convicted by US Court of Law. In my analysis, Social Security Act of 1935 amended in 1996 does not uphold Constitution as the Supreme Law of this Land.

I ask my readers to make distinction between Social Security Tax and Monthly Retirement Benefit. The first represents tax paid to government and the second represents earning or wage entitled to retired person to provide income and security during old age.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

EQUAL PROTECTIONS FOR WORK AND RETIREMENT TO ALL US TAXPAYERS

US CONGRESS SLAVE DRIVER – THE 150th ANNIVERSARY OF THE 13th AMENDMENT. From left, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., and Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. lower their heads in prayer during a commemoration ceremony for the 150th anniversary of ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which abolished slavery in the United States, Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2015, in Emancipation Hall on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

 

Speaker.gov

 

 

Press Release

The 150th Anniversary of the 13th Amendment

December 9, 2015|Speaker Ryan’s Press Office

WASHINGTON – Earlier today, at a ceremony in Emancipation Hall of the United States Capitol Visitor Center, President Obama and leaders of Congress commemorated the 150th anniversary of the 13th amendment to the Constitution. Following are House Speaker Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) remarks at the ceremony, as prepared for delivery:
The Thirteenth Amendment is just 43 words long. It is so short that, when you read it, you can almost miss the whole significance. You have to stop and remind yourself that 600,000 people died in the Civil War—600,000 died over 43 words. Or to be more precise, they died in a war that decided whether those 43 words would ever be written.

And not everyone supported the Thirteenth Amendment. There was fierce opposition. But I think it is telling that when the state of Maryland held a referendum to abolish slavery, it was the votes of Union soldiers that put it over the top. It was the men who had been in the field and heard the battle cries and seen heroic deeds. They knew, better than most, that everyone in that field was an American.

A private in the 89th Illinois put it best. He wrote, “I have often [heard] of men say that they would not fight beside a negro soldier but . . . the whites and blacks charged together and they fell just as well as [we] did. . . . I have seen a great [many] fighting for our country. Then why should they not be free[?]”

It took a war for us to answer that question. We should be honest with ourselves. It took centuries of cruelty and injustice. But today we celebrate the moment when our country decided: Yes, they should be free. They would be free. And we thought this decision was so important that for the first time in half a century, we amended the Constitution. From then on, it would be the supreme law of the land.

And so today we celebrate this 43-word amendment, this “new birth of freedom.” “It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.” And we should remember all that it took: the historic battles, the great generals, yes—but also the men in the ranks, the names we have forgotten, especially the men who had once been enslaved: men like William H. Carney and Andrew Jackson Smith.

These men were segregated. They were mistreated. And yet they still fought. They fought for a country that had denied them their freedom. They fought for all of us. And so when we read those 43 short and simple words, we should remember these men and what they did. We should realize those words, like their acts, are gallant, noble, profound. We have witnessed true greatness in this country. And when we ratified the Thirteenth Amendment, we committed ourselves to building a country just as great.

That is what those 43 words mean. That is what they represent. And that is more than worthy of celebration. Thank you.

Tags: U.S. Capitol, Ceremony, Constitution

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US Congress Slave Driver – The 150th Anniversary of the 13th Amendment. Congress enacted legislation Section.202(y) of Social Security Act imposing Slavery and Involuntary Servitude denying opportunity to retire from work after collecting taxes until attainment of full retirement age.

THE REPEAL MOVEMENT TO GIVE EQUAL EMPLOYMENT AND RETIREMENT BENEFITS TO TAXPAYING US WORKERS.

US Social Security Administration must either obtain criminal conviction or designate US taxpayer as “SLAVE” to withhold payment of monthly retirement income benefit duly approved by insurance plan.

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LABOR DAY MUSINGS – DEFINING AMERICAN WORKPLACE

LABOR DAY MUSINGS – DEFINING AMERICAN WORKPLACE

In the United States, Labor activists, and Labor Unions made great progress to defend the rights of Working Class. Unfortunately this progress was totally undermined by the US Congress which enacted legislation that took away dignity of unskilled, hourly wage earners who perform painful toil on the US soil. For example, US President Bill Clinton on August 22, 1996 signed into Law, Public Law 104-193, ‘The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act’ (PRWORA) which places restrictions on the payments of monthly retirement income benefits to workers in the US under Title II of the Social Security Act. Refer to Section 401(b) (2) of PRWORA.

For many unskilled, hourly wage earners performing labor in the US, American Workplace is defined as Work until Death for they have no Retirement option. For those who have no Retirement option, American Workplace is defined by the Book of Genesis, Chapter 3, verses 17 to 19.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 48104-4162.

IN 1882, LABOR DAY ORIGINATED WITH A PARADE HELD IN NEW YORK CITY

Posted on Monday September 04, 2017 by EMILY NONKO

Clipped from: https://www.6sqft.com/in-1882-labor-day-originated-with-a-parade-held-in-nyc/

An illustration of the first Labor Day parade, via Wiki Commons

Though Labor Day has been embraced as a national holiday–albeit one many Americans don’t know the history of–it originated right here in New York City. The holiday is a result of the city’s labor unions fighting for worker’s rights throughout the 1800’s. The event was first observed, unofficially, on Tuesday, September 5th, 1882, with thousands marching from City Hall up to Union Square. At the time, the New York Times considered the event to be unremarkable. But 135 years later, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of every September as a tribute to all American workers. It’s also a good opportunity to recognize the hard-won accomplishments of New York unions to secure a better workplace for us today.

According to Untapped Cities, the holiday has its roots in a common 19th century tradition in which laborers held picnics and parades to draw awareness to worker’s rights. Organized unions emerged from there, and New York City became a hotbed for labor activists by the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s.

View of South Street during the Industrial Revolution, via the Metropolitan Museum of New York

Back then, laborers were fighting against low wages, unfair hours, child labor and unsafe working environments. (Most workers at the time worked six days a week, 10 or 12 hours a day, and Sunday was the only day off. There were no paid vacations, no sick days and very few breaks during a day.) Two labor groups, the Knights of Labor and the Tailor’s Union, established a city-wide trade consortium–known as the Central Labor Union of New York, Brooklyn, and Jersey City, or the CLU–in January of 1882 to promote similar goals. They called for things like fair wages, an eight-hour workday and an end to child labor. The group also proposed that for one day a year, the country celebrate American workers with parades and celebrations. The CLU went ahead and organized the first parade for the September 5th of that year.

According to Brownstoner, two different men within the labor movement were credited for the parade. Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed a holiday and parade in 1882. He was the secretary of the CLU. But that same year, Peter J. McGuire, cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, also proposed a parade. The debate between the original founder of Labor Day was never settled, though Matthew Maguire usually gets the credit.

The parade began outside City Hall, with the CLU advertising it as a display of the “strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations.” It was important to the event that the men gave up a day’s pay to partake in the festivities. And they did arrive in droves, with banners and signs with slogans like “NO MONEY MONOPOLY” and “LABOR BUILT THIS REPUBLIC AND LABOR SHALL RULE IT.”

No drinking was allowed at the parade, which featured everyone from the Jewelers Union of Newark to the typographical union, which was known as ‘The Big Six.’ Along the route, which passed Canal Street on its way to Union Square, hundreds of seamstresses hung out the windows cheering the procession, blowing kisses and waving their handkerchiefs. It’s said as many as 20,000 men marched that day.

The party after the marchers hit Union Square was celebratory, according to the New York history book Gotham. Here’s a passage from the book:

Finally, after passing by a reviewing stand filled with labor dignitaries, the participants adjourned, via the elevated, to an uptown picnic at Elm Park. There they danced to jigs by Irish fiddlers and pipers and were serenaded by the Bavarian Mountain Singers while the flags of Ireland, Germany, France, and the USA flapped in the autumn air.

Labor Day parade float in New York City, early 20th century, via New York Department of Labor

Labor parades began in other cities around the county, and for a while the day was known as “the workingman’s holiday.” By 1886, several cities had an annual parade, with legislation in the works to make the day a state holiday. Though New York was the first state to introduce a bill to make the holiday official, Oregon was the first to actually pass it as law in 1887. New York quickly followed suit that same year, as did New Jersey, Massachusetts and Colorado.

Labor unions, of course, went on to secure rights like the eight-hour work day, collective bargaining, health insurance, retirement funds and better wages. These days, the holiday is better known as a marker to the end of summer than a celebration of the working class. But it’s a nice reminder such hard-fought battles, which brought accomplishments that now define the American workplace, took root in New York.

Tags : Labor Day